Why I am voting YES to Scottish Independence

A few days ago I was asked to answer three questions by the Bogata Post – my cousin works there – regarding my stance as a “Yes” voter in the upcoming referendum on Scottish Independence. The piece hasn’t appeared yet, but I thought I might as well post what I wrote just to some of my views into the mix. Here it is…

twibbonI’ve been trying to put all of this in some form of elegant prose for quite a bit of the evening, but I figure I had better just get on with saying my piece in as concise a manner as possible, and leave the rest for you to judge. Before I answer the three questions, I feel that I should first state that I am not Scottish, but was born in Northern Ireland and have lived in Scotland for 10 years. This background makes me naturally quite jumpy when the issue of nationalism comes up – whether we are talking about Irish Nationalism, UK Nationalism or Scottish Nationalism. I deplore politics that is based upon “helping our own first”, or “defending what my grandparents fought for” and other such tropes. It took A LOT for me to come round to the idea of Scottish Independence. With this in mind, I’ll now quickly turn to the three questions posed.

  1. Why are you pro-independence?

I am voting for Indpendence because I see this as an amazing opportunity to effect change that could be immensely positive for every person living in the British Isles, and to a lesser extent those beyond this small group of islands.

Recently I bought into the #YesBecause hashtag on Twitter and posted two tweets which pretty much sum up my attitude:

“I’m #YesBecause UK politics is broken, and Independence provides the only real opportunity for actual change for everyone on these islands.”

“I’m #YesBecause both Scotland & rUK need to leave Empire behind once and for all and look to a peaceful, sustainable future of co-operation.”

To expand further on these soundbites, the future that I want for Scotland and the rest of the British Isles is one where we no longer try to play at the ‘big boys table’, where we have the courage to leave nuclear weapons behind us, where we prioritise welfare and helping those most in need, where we open our borders to those in need across the world and where we are willing to accept a much less comfortable standard of living in order to make real change for the better for everyone on the planet. The future I want is one where we care for the environment, promote equality across society, and participate fully in wonderful boundary-breaking and peace-building institutions such as the EU, rather than consistently and beligerently sitting on the sidelines refusing to compromise or change.

I am under no illusions that Independence will bring the idealistic future that I want overnight, or at all… but I do know that if Scotland votes for Independence from the United Kingdom it will force the United Kingdom to re-assess its identity, values and priorities, and provide the people of Scotland with an unprecendented opportunity to start the democratic experiment afresh in the twenty-first century, with the benefit of hundreds of years of hindsight. It might fail… but if we don’t take the opportunity we will never know. I know that this idealistic vision invites the response “yes, but how can you effect all this change if the country has no money?” And to that I would simply say a) money isn’t everything b) money hasn’t exactly helped the UK, as far as my priorities are concerned.

  1. What has the atmosphere been like in the run-up to the vote- any tensions between the two sides etc?

This answer will be much shorter, I promise. In terms of the political ‘debate’ – if we can call it that – the atmosphere has been particularly ghastly. Both sides simply shout at each other. Both demand factual answers to questions that cannot be answered in a situation where neither side will admit that a) their position might not win b) they might have to negotiate with the other ‘side’ even if they do win. The Facebook pages of both campaigns are some of the worst cesspools of the internet, attracting the kind of abusive comments that one would expect… on most websites, to be honest.

In terms of the way things have been portrayed in the media, I am utterly frustrated by this. IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT THE ECONOMY, FOLKS. In particular, IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT “THE CURRENCY QUESTION”. As far as I am concerned, and as far as most folk that I speak to on both sides of the debate seem to be concerned, the currency issue is far down on our list of concerns… yet the media has decided that this is what the debate hangs upon, and thus reports everything within that light. It also doesn’t help that the UK media is part of the UK status quo, and like any businesses which have UK-wide markets, they understandably want to avoid unpredictability and maintain things the way they are. Understandable, perhaps… but not great for unbiased reporting.

In terms of things on the ground, apart from a few clear exceptions I would say that the ‘debate’ has been pretty good-natured… except that in my opinion no one is really going to change their views. Everyone has differing priorities, and thus we all tend to talk past each other. I have, of course, seen/heard plenty of friends make comments that they are fed up of the debate, or that they feel that the debate is ugly, causing division and forcing them to choose sides etc. To that I can only say that I imagine people would feel the same way if ‘we’ got so worked up about ‘normal’ elections. I think there is a tendency on these islands to not like being confronted with ‘opinions’, or being seen to hold ‘opinions’… and perhaps this is a problem that we will need to address come the UK General Election in 2015.

  1. What do you honestly think the outcome will be?

Honestly, I think that the vote will be a “No”. I think that people are far more likely to “bottle it” than to say “oh, what the hell” when they make it to the polling booth. And I think that most people will vote “No” for potentially very understandable reasons… worries about their job, their family, their mortgage. All I will be able to say in that case is that I voted for what I thought was right, that I tried for once in my life to not be as selfish as I normally am, and that I will try to keep this level of political engagement going forward into the coming decades and try my hardest to effect the sorts of changes I would like to see occurring in Scotland, the British Isles, Europe and beyond. But I also think that the vote will be close… and that whatever happens, there will be a high enough percentage of votes for “Yes” to cause some serious questioning and reflection for politicians going forward. And maybe… maybe… I will be pleasantly surprised.

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About Chris

Scholar of religion/nonreligion... PhD Student (Lancaster University), blogger, singer, actor, thinker... Northern Irish living in Scotland. Co-founder of The Religious Studies Project. Director at the NSRN. Baritone masquerading as a tenor. Vegetarian for no particular reason.

6 responses to “Why I am voting YES to Scottish Independence”

  1. Witty Ludwig says :

    I found this really interesting:

    “All I will be able to say in that case is that I voted for what I thought was right, that I tried for once in my life to not be as selfish as I normally am, and that I will try to keep this level of political engagement going forward into the coming decades and try my hardest to effect the sorts of changes I would like to see occurring in Scotland, the British Isles, Europe and beyond.”

    As I have a Scottish colleague who only a couple of days ago, very eerily, said almost these words verbatim as to why he would be voting ‘no’. His perspective being: he has to vote for what he feels is right, contrary to what his heart wants. and that he thinks it’s the selfless thing to do because it might be his children, other people’s children, etc., who pay the price for the decision should the economics spiral.

    It has been interesting as a spectator (I’m English).

    • Chris says :

      I’ve found the same thing, too. I guess because we tend to gravitate to people of the same mindset, many of my friends would have similar reasons for voting Yes and No. Good to know that it’s not just me :)

      We’ll have to see what happens…

  2. Mohammad Magout says :

    I wonder, Chris, since you lived in Northern Ireland, what would be the implications of a Yes vote in Scotland on Northern Ireland? Would there be another referendum in the near future? Would Scottish independence mean effectively the end of the United Kingdom sooner or later?

    • Chris says :

      Northern Ireland is an interesting place. I don’t think it is best helped by being part of the UK. But then again, the other three options (that I can immediately see) – the Republic of Ireland rejoining the UK, Northern Ireland becoming an Independent nation, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland uniting – would all also be incredibly problematic to say the least!

      In terms of my uneducated view on the matter, I don’t think there would be a move for independence on the part of many in Northern Ireland. But a lot of Northern Irish loyalists who have strong ties to Scotland would end up having to do a lot of re-assessing of their identity, and who knows what that might lead to. Perhaps more violence, as that reassessment takes place? Maybe, maybe not. But I doubt a referendum.

      In terms of the UK and it’s relationship to Northern Ireland… I think if Scotland were to leave, England/Wales might eventually re-assess what they are actually doing being in Northern Ireland in the first place. Again, I don’t know what this reassessment would lead to. I guess once the Scottish connection is severed, the Northern Irish MIGHT start to feel more Irish than British, and the whole dynamic of the situation could change. I can only hope that in this ‘feeling’ and ‘reassessment’ that there is debate, rather than violence.

      Undoubtedly, I can see Scottish Independence having effects upon Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK, and in the short term these might end up being quite negative effects – as, indeed, they might be for Scotland. But what I hope is that by destabilizing and de-legitimizing London rule, a more equitable arrangement can be reached between these five nations (as they currently stand), where they work in co-operation for the betterment of everyone within their borders, and share that betterment with those less fortunate around the globe.

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